Zen Habits That Will Literally Transform Your Life! (Part 1)

Today we bring you the top Zen habits that will literally transform your life. Have you ever marveled at those people who may be in utter tranquility but amid total chaos? Those people who are… irrevocably at peace? Whose inner peace is radiating far beyond the events of your external environment? Sure, you have met some. Did you know that these people are not born with a genetic predisposition to serenity? They were born in the same biologically human body as you; it is just that they manage to connect their brains to make these Zen habits their normal state of being. But guess that? You can do it too; you just have to retrain your mind and refocus on developing new habits. Fortunately, this article is to help you develop these peaceful Zen habits. The more you remember these simple methods, the faster they will become a natural part of you.

 

THE FIRST OF THE GREAT ZEN HABITS: AVOID MULTITASKING

In today’s life and the Western world, many of us have become used to letting ourselves be carried away by multitasking. And science has long shown that our brains are incapable of dexterity in multitasking mode. Researchers claim that human multitasking is a mere illusion. Our brains can only pay attention to more than one task if they are fully or partially automated and are not in the same order, such as making food and listening to the radio. On the other occasions, what we do is jump quickly and sequentially from one task to another. For example, if we focus too much on a visual task, awareness of stimuli related to other senses is reduced … Doesn’t it happen to you?

Answer this question: Do you feel identified with any of these behaviors?

  • Eating while looking at the mobile phone.
  • Watching television answering messages.
  • Talk to a colleague at work while answering an email.
  • Talk to your partner with your ear set on the game that is on the radio or television.
  • Prepare dinner while we help our son with some homework.

Sooner or later, your partner will end up saying, “are you listening to me?” or you will realize that you have hit the key and sent an email with misspellings and nonsense phrases. This has to be stopped. The arrival of current technology in our lives has complicated things a lot. And mobile phones have become the demons of our inner peace -a multitude of notifications that do not allow us to focus on anything we are doing. These artifacts have priority in our life. And we allow it. Being at various things simultaneously does not allow us to enjoy the moments we deserve in peace and tranquility. It does not help us improve our performance in other activities that require our full attention. Multitasking prevents us from focusing and is reflected in a significant loss of cognitive and relational efficiency.

A study by psychologists David Strayer and Fran Drews of the University of Utah ruled in 2006 that cell phone use while driving is as dangerous as driving drunk. Are we already clear that multitasking is not good? Our life is at stake. The time has come to an end for specific behaviors that do not help us have a simple life. Executing several tasks in parallel is inefficient and very stressful; the best thing is to focus our attention on one thing and then carry out another job. A Zen proverb says: “When you walk, walk. When you eat, eat.” If we play with our child, let’s do it to be a memorable, quality moment without interference. If we eat, we enjoy each flavor, texture, and color and do not harm it with the interference of another kind. And if we talk to someone, we pay our full attention to that person; it will be our turn to speak later. Allow me a suggestion: make a list of 10 things you can do to avoid multitasking. And then spend the necessary time, one at a time, to separate them from your life. Look for a simple life. We must be fully present in everything we do. It will be a great step towards a Zen life.

 

Stay tuned for the next parts!