Do Muslims, Christians, And Jews Worship The Same God? (Part 5)

Do Muslims, Christians, And Jews Worship The Same God? (Part 5)

Judaism, Christianity, and Islam are what one might call sibling religions. Christianity is the largest of the three, with between 1.7 and two billion professors in the world. Muslims are just over one billion, and the Jews are about 18 million. However, they have common roots, meaning there are remarkable similarities between the three religions and essential differences. Let’s check all about it in this article! This is a continuation of the fourth part of this article. If you haven’t yet read the firstsecond, and third parts, do it now!

 

Today, Muslims are involved in many conflicts. In both Asia and Africa, Christian tribes may end up at war with Muslims. News reporting always focuses on the religious issue and states it as the cause. It contributes to further contradictions elsewhere in the world. In Saudi Arabia, many are dissatisfied with the rule or misrule of the prosperous princes. The royal family’s relationship with the United States has drawn the United States into the conflict and directed Al-Qaeda groups‘ hatred of the state they believe wants to control the entire Middle East and impose foreign customs on them.

Christianity, Islam and Judaism: They Can Peacefully Co-exist | Egyptian Streets

 

In many other countries, conservative forces have gathered around religion as a guarantor of ancient traditions. A good society is often associated with the nuclear family and the old gender roles. All the world’s religions have been given such a function in their respective countries. Opponents of abortion and homosexuality see Judaism, Christianity, and Islam as equally reliable helpers struggling for a more individualistic society. Christians who want gender equality may believe that Islam is oppressive to women, but Muslim feminists believe that Islam is the religion of equality. The struggle is going on in all religions, but outsiders do not see it. They think that their own religion stands for good and other faiths for evil.

Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, by Amanullah De Sondy and others | Times Higher Education (THE)

 

In this context, one should avoid talking about the struggle for or against the “modern”. Many militant groups within Islam want a modern society because corruption and privileges for ruling groups disappear. Everyone should receive an education, and wealth is distributed fairly. They are also highly benevolent towards modern technology and not at all like the Amish people, so that they would prefer a lifelike in the 18th century. However, they are not always what we call modern in their view of the family and private morality. They cling to the heterosexual nuclear family, and with it come old patriarchal patterns that can also be reflected in society. Men are considered more appropriate to lead and take the ultimate responsibility. Women must raise children and take care of the home. But these ideals occur in all three religions. Many Christians in Asia, Africa, and Latin America embrace them to the same degree as some Muslims. They want social and economic development as in Europe, but not European sexual morality.

 

In the long run, all three religions expect the good to prevail. In the short term, perceptions may differ. Jews are not so focused on the individual’s happiness after death. They hope that the people and humanity will get better but have no definite idea of ​​the fate of the individual. Christians and Muslims like to talk about being united with God after death and after the final judgment. Jews may think that it is too tiny and selfish a goal to love God to “get to heaven”. They primarily want a better world and the liberation of all humanity from evil.

 

This is a move that could pose a significant challenge to other religions. Christians and Muslims want to see their beliefs to save the world, but their preaching is easily perceived as a guarantee of happiness with elements of selfish calculation. If religions are to contribute to peace and harmony on earth, one must first eradicate the idea of ​​having a monopoly on God and the truth. All good forces must work together for a better world. The three religions have the same moral message and the same hope for the future. That community must not be overshadowed by a proclamation characterized by complacency and territorial thinking.